News

News

Adding copper strengthens 3D-printed titanium

Data: 2019-12-06
Views: 229

Adding copper strengthens 3D-printed titanium

IMAGE: 3D-PRINTED TITANIUM-COPPER BARS WITH TITANIUM POWDER AND COPPER POWDER.


Successful trials of titanium-copper alloys for 3D printing could kickstart a new range of high-performance alloys for medical device, defence and aerospace applications.


Current titanium alloys used in additive manufacturing often cool and bond together in column-shaped crystals during the 3D printing process, making them prone to cracking or distortion.


And unlike aluminium or other commonly used metals, there is no commercial grain refiner for titanium that manufacturers can use to effectively refine the microstructure to avoid these issues.


But now a new titanium alloy with copper, unveiled today in Nature, appears to have solved this problem.


Professor Mark Easton from RMIT University's School of Engineering said their titanium-copper alloy printed with 'exceptional properties' without any special process control or additional treatment.


'Of particular note was its fully equiaxed grain structure: this means the crystal grains had grown equally in all directions to form a strong bond, instead of in columns, which can lead to weak points liable to cracking.'


'Alloys with this microstructure can withstand much higher forces and will be much less likely to have defects, such as cracking or distortion, during manufacture,' Easton said.


The collaborative project involved leading researchers in the area of alloy composition and grain microstructure from RMIT University, CSIRO, the University of Queensland and the Ohio State University.


CSIRO Senior Principal Research Scientist, Dr Mark Gibson, said their findings also suggest similar metal systems could be treated in the same way to improve their properties.


'Titanium-copper alloys are one option, particularly if the use of other additional alloying elements or heat treatments can be employed to improve the properties further,' he said.


'But there are also a number of other alloying elements that are likely to have similar effects. These could all have applications in the aerospace and biomedical industries.'


Gibson said the new breed of alloys could increase manufacturers' production rates and allow for more complex parts to be manufactured.


'In general, it opens up the possibility of developing a new range of titanium-based alloys specifically developed for 3D printing with exceptional properties,' he said.


'It has been a delight, as it has been my good fortune for some time, to work on such an interesting and significant project as this with such a talented band of scientists.'


Via: https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-12/ru-acs120319.php

Note: Content may be edited for style and length.

News / Recommended news More
2020 - 01 - 22
Heusler alloys are magnetic materials made from three different metals that are not magnetic individually. The alloys are used broadly for their magnetic and thermoelectric properties, and their ability to regain their original shape after being deformed, known as shape memory. Investigations by Tohoku University's advanced materials scientist An-Pang Tsai and colleagues now show that these materi...
2020 - 01 - 10
3D printed Titanium alloys under an electron microscope: sample on the left with large, elongated crystals was printed conventionally, while sample on the right with finer, shorter crystals was printed sitting on a ultrasonic generator. Credit: RMIT UniversityResearchers have used sound vibrations to shake metal alloy grains into tighter formation during 3-D printing.A study can have a signif...
2020 - 01 - 03
The ability to 3D print titanium-alloy objects certainly does open up some intriguing possibilities. That said, the finished items aren't always as strong as they could be. Now, new research suggests that adding copper to those alloys could make a big difference.Typically, when objects are being 3D printed out of titanium alloy, a laser is used to selectively melt a powder consisting of titan...
2019 - 12 - 27
Russian scientists have developed a new generation of extrahard alloys, which will be used for the creation of equipment for mining in the extreme conditions of the Arctic region, said Yevgeny Levashov, the project manager and a professor of the Russian National University of Science and Technology.According to Levashov, the new alloys were created as part of the state program for the development ...
Share:
Uniris Exhibition Shanghai Co., Ltd.
Shanghai Branch
Tel:4000 778 909
E-mail:irisexpo@163.com
  
Guangzhou Branch
Tel:020-8327 6389
E-mail:pmchina@unifair.com

CCEC CHINA official website
犀牛云提供企业云服务
Scan the QR code to visit the official website by phone